England Trip Part Four: London

We spent our last day in England in London and had a great time! We began by seeing all the major sights like Big Ben, the London Eye, etc. Then Alex toured Westminster Abbey while I got some coffee (I had already toured it when I studied abroad in London). Then we went to Spurgeon's church, the Metropolitan Tabernacle. It was closed, but luckily, one of the kind secretaries who worked at the church let us in and gave us a brief tour. She updated us on everything the church is doing now and how God has continued to work there over the years!

After that, we went to Bunhill fields (a non-conformist burial site) and then on to see where Spurgeon and his wife Susannah are buried. It was really impactful to see the graves of people who God used so much. Whenever I see graves like theirs, it always causes me to reflect on what I want my legacy to be. I long for my legacy to be that I loved Christ and loved others. Here's a few of my favorite pictures:

Left: Alex recently read a biography on Winston Churchill and now he's obsessed with him so he just HAD to get a picture in front of the statue! :) Right: Alex outside of Westminster Abbey! Alex got to tour it while I relaxed at a coffee shop (I had already toured it when I studied abroad)!

Left: Alex recently read a biography on Winston Churchill and now he's obsessed with him so he just HAD to get a picture in front of the statue! :) Right: Alex outside of Westminster Abbey! Alex got to tour it while I relaxed at a coffee shop (I had already toured it when I studied abroad)!

This isWestminster Chapel where Martin Lloyd-Jones preached. I had the privilege of attending this church when I studied abroad in London!

This isWestminster Chapel where Martin Lloyd-Jones preached. I had the privilege of attending this church when I studied abroad in London!

St. James Park

St. James Park

The Metropolitan Tabernacle where Spurgeon ministered for over 30 years. Alex's doctoral work is centered largely around Spurgeon, this building, and the ministry that was carried out from it. You can read more about Spurgeon in Part 2. 

The Metropolitan Tabernacle where Spurgeon ministered for over 30 years. Alex's doctoral work is centered largely around Spurgeon, this building, and the ministry that was carried out from it. You can read more about Spurgeon in Part 2

  A very sweet woman actually let us come into the building, though it was closed to take a brief look around. This bust of Spurgeon greeted us in the side room where we entered.

 

A very sweet woman actually let us come into the building, though it was closed to take a brief look around. This bust of Spurgeon greeted us in the side room where we entered.

Do you recognize this? This is a picture of where Spurgeon was baptized. We got to visit that spot and I posted pictures in Part 2 of this blog series.

Do you recognize this? This is a picture of where Spurgeon was baptized. We got to visit that spot and I posted pictures in Part 2 of this blog series.

This is the current pulpit, not original to Spurgeon's day, but still beautiful. Unfortunately, the building was mostly destroyed during WWII. They were able to keep the original front of the tabernacle intact.

This is the current pulpit, not original to Spurgeon's day, but still beautiful. Unfortunately, the building was mostly destroyed during WWII. They were able to keep the original front of the tabernacle intact.

Alex in Dr. Peter Masters' pulpit. Masters is the current pastor of the Metropolitan Tabernacle and deliberately continues in a Spurgeonic legacy of reformed preaching and evangelism. When he first came in 1970, the church had been whittled down to about 30 people. They now run roughly 1,000 on a Sunday morning!

Alex in Dr. Peter Masters' pulpit. Masters is the current pastor of the Metropolitan Tabernacle and deliberately continues in a Spurgeonic legacy of reformed preaching and evangelism. When he first came in 1970, the church had been whittled down to about 30 people. They now run roughly 1,000 on a Sunday morning!

We were able to make it over to Bunhill fields where many Puritans were buried. This is John Bunyan's grave, which is in the most prominent place in the cemetery. John Owen was buried only about 15 feet away from Bunyan. Fitting given their mutual admiration for one another. I actually had the chance to visit Bunhill fields back in 2008 when I studied abroad and I wrote a post about it here. It's fun to reflect back on all God has taught me and done in my life since I wrote that post!

We were able to make it over to Bunhill fields where many Puritans were buried. This is John Bunyan's grave, which is in the most prominent place in the cemetery. John Owen was buried only about 15 feet away from Bunyan. Fitting given their mutual admiration for one another. I actually had the chance to visit Bunhill fields back in 2008 when I studied abroad and I wrote a post about it here. It's fun to reflect back on all God has taught me and done in my life since I wrote that post!

Just across the street from Bunhill Fields is John Wesley's Chapel and parish. Unfortunately it was closed that day but we still got to stroll around the grounds.

Just across the street from Bunhill Fields is John Wesley's Chapel and parish. Unfortunately it was closed that day but we still got to stroll around the grounds.

Outside St. Paul's Cathedral

Outside St. Paul's Cathedral

We were able to snap a few quick photos before they told us photography wasn't allowed. Oops! Many famous funerals have been held in this building including Winston Churchill's and Princess Diana's. Also Christopher Wren and Lord Admiral Nelson were buried in the basement of the cathedral.

We were able to snap a few quick photos before they told us photography wasn't allowed. Oops! Many famous funerals have been held in this building including Winston Churchill's and Princess Diana's. Also Christopher Wren and Lord Admiral Nelson were buried in the basement of the cathedral.

After some wandering around and getting a little lost, we finally found Spurgeon's grave in Norwood Cemetery. Absolutely amazing!

After some wandering around and getting a little lost, we finally found Spurgeon's grave in Norwood Cemetery. Absolutely amazing!

Spurgeon's stone reads: "For since by faith I saw the stream/ Thy flowing wounds supply Redeeming love has been my theme And shall be till I die Then in a nobler sweeter song I'll sing thy power to save When this poor lisping stammering tongue Lies silent in the grave"

Spurgeon's stone reads:
"For since by faith I saw the stream/
Thy flowing wounds supply
Redeeming love has been my theme
And shall be till I die

Then in a nobler sweeter song
I'll sing thy power to save
When this poor lisping stammering tongue
Lies silent in the grave"

Susannah's stone reads (Spurgeon's wife): "His love in time past forbids me to think He'll leave me at last in trouble to sink Each sweet Ebenezer I have in review Confirms his good pleasure to help me quite through Since all that I meet shall work for my good The bitter is sweet, the medicine food Though painful at present twill cease before long And then oh how pleasant the conquerors song"  

Susannah's stone reads (Spurgeon's wife):
"His love in time past forbids me to think
He'll leave me at last in trouble to sink
Each sweet Ebenezer I have in review
Confirms his good pleasure to help me quite through
Since all that I meet shall work for my good
The bitter is sweet, the medicine food
Though painful at present twill cease before long
And then oh how pleasant the conquerors song"
 

Other pictures from our phones that Alex took in Westminster Abbey and I took in St. Paul's:

We climbed a TON of stairs to get to the top of the dome in St. Paul's. It was amazing! 

We climbed a TON of stairs to get to the top of the dome in St. Paul's. It was amazing!